One of our favourite discoveries at this year’s True Believers was The Show by Jed McPherson – who launched the first issue that weekend. This tale of a crazy reality show run by a drug addled TV exec was a really exciting find, but it also led to us discovering his amazing previous work like Deadbeat and Jacob. Keen to discover more about this exciting new talent we caught up with Jed to talk gonzo reality TV, crime noir and deadbeat dads.

James Bond #1Since his creation by Ian Fleming in 1953, the iconic James Bond 007 has regularly appeared in all forms of entertainment, except comics. But now Dynamite comics have recruited legendary writer Warren Ellis to put together an ongoing series of England’s most dangerous secret agent. But will this new title leave readers shaken or stirred?

This weekends must read digital comics in the Sunday Digest include Warren Ellis’ new eco apocalypse series Trees from Image Comics, Ian Edginton and INJ Culbard’s clock punk fairytale Brass Sun from 2000 AD and the latest instalment of slacker superhero series Knuckleheads from MonkeyBrain Comics.

This March, Marvel Comics will illuminate the dark recesses of the Marvel Universe as it launches a new monthly Moon Knight series by award-winning and critically acclaimed writer Warren Ellis (Iron Man: ExtremisAstonishing X-Men) and the outstanding artistic team of Declan Shalvey and Jordie Bellaire (Venom; Deadpool).

Amidst the opening of New York Comic-Con 2013, news arrived that Avatar Press, publisher of Garth Ennis’ groundbreaking horror series Crossed, announced an exclusive digital distribution agreement with ComiXology, the revolutionary cloud-based digital comics platform with more than 40,000 comics and graphic novels that have seen over 200 million downloads to date. The multi-year exclusive agreement covers Avatar Press’ English Language single-issue catalog.

It’s been a milestone week this week as Image Comics celebrated their 20th anniversary. As a comics fan growing up in the early 1990s, I was a massive fan of all things Image and so it fills me with a great sense of pride and nostalgia to look back on what they meant to the comics industry and to me personally. As a kid my heroes weren’t sportsmen or movie stars, they were comic artists. I worshipped every pen and ink stroke of Todd McFarlane, Erik Larsen and Rob Liefeld. I knew every panel of early issues of Spawn, Savage Dragon and Youngblood and still do to this day.

So when these three super-artists left Marvel in 1992 to form a new company alongside Jim Lee, Jim Valentino and While Portacio I had no idea what the significance was, or why there were doing it, just so long as I could get new and exciting books from my heroes – and what could better than them writing and drawing their own titles? I didn’t understand that they had left Marvel to pursue creative autonomy and would shape the future of modern comics by putting the emphasis on the creator rather than the corporation, I was more interested in searching high and low for every new Image release I could get my hands on.