NEMO ROG COVERNemo vol. 3: River of Ghosts sees us leap forward to the 1970s where an ageing Janni is on a mission to South America in order to finally track down and thwart her immortal enemy Ayesha, accompanied by a burly Irish bodyguard, her runaway grandson, and the ghosts of her late husband and crew. But will this final journey be a fitting end for the daughter of the great captain Nemo.

Nemo volume 2 Roses of BerlinThe second book in Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s spin-off from the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Roses of Berlin sees us plunged into the world of German expressionism as Janni and her crew of pirates go on a mission into the heart of Nazi Germany to rescue her daughter and son-in-law from a German version of the League. But will this be a journey too far for those at the back who aren’t paying attention to the literary references?

sequntialSequential is the brilliant new digital comics app from Panel Nine, the team behind deluxe graphic novels like Verity Fair and Dapper John. Taking those titles, and putting them under one handy storefront, alongside books from other small UK publishers like Knockabout, Myriad and Blank Slate, it’s a fantastic way for out of print titles from comics legends like David Lloyd, Alan Moore and Brian Bolland to reach a new digital audience. Keen to find out more about this unique app we contacted publisher Russell Willis to ask him for the lowdown on this new venture and how it was set to take on the might of ComiXology!

NEMO_HOI_FC_PromoThere’s no denying that Alan Moore is a visionary comics writer, his résumé speaks for itself. But in recent years as his work has taken a more avant grade and experimental approach, not always for the better. The League of Extraordinary Gentleman, once his most well rounded book has descended into psychedelic insanity, perhaps as a reaction to the ill fated movie, and subsequent books, especially the recent 1969 and 2009 editions, although brimming with inventive ideas became oblique and pretentious. They were still packed full of insightful references from the world of music, art and literature and Kevin O’Neill’s art still bristled with energy and imagination, but as the references became increasingly obscure and the characters often more and more self indulgent each issue seemed to require a degree in occult literature and an epic companion glossary just to make head nor tail of it. Although it is great to know that someone is at least making intelligent comics,  showing off how much you know about obscure literarty characters it does not always make for the most interesting read.