Avery Hill continue their run of unique and exciting comics for 2017 with Something City, the debut book from Ellice Weaver. This landscape orientated collection of short stories focuses on the interconnected lives of a group of people living in the titular city and features everything from hip young things, to prisoners in a minimum security prison to nudists! We catch up with Ellice to find out more about the inspiration behind the stories as well as how she created the unique and colourful look.

This new offering from Avery Hill is a collection of three stories from American illustrator and artist, George Wylesole and is one of those books which is hard to sum up and eloquently describe, as the constituent elements are so weird and bizarre that describing them in isolation doesn’t really do them justice. However when they’re combined into this 90+ page volume, Ghosts Etc. becomes another tour de force from one of the UK scene’s most exciting publishers.

Deep Space Canine is a bit like the small press equivalent of a mighty Marvel team-up, as Hannah Chapman’s Comic Book Slumber Party crew join forces with the awesome Avery Hill to bring us this fantastic anthology starring CBSP’s galaxy trotting, hydro-herb smoking heroine Captain Greasy.

bigcartel_headerIt’s been a great year for those fine folks at Avery Hill Publishing, thanks to titles like Artifical Flowers and The City Insdie. And 2017 is looking to continue that trend as they have 4 great new books coming, including a new collaboration with the Comic Book Slumber Party. We take an early look at their eclectic new range for the new year.

untitled_apeThe latest offering from Avery Hill Publishing, Steven Tillotson’s Untitled Ape’s Epic Adventure sees a ghostly purple ape creature head off on a globe-trotting journey to try and find his family in the jungle, with the help of a sarcastic cat companion. It’s a book that defies expectations and take you to places you never knew existed, but will it be an adventure of epic proportions or will it be over before it even begins?

indie-round-upWe’re still buzzing after the excellent Bristol Comics and Zines Fair and so thought we would take a look at some of the books we picked up from creators who we encountered for the first time at the show. These include Tim Bird’s Grey Area from Avery Hill, Cristian Ortiz’s military fantasy adventure in Golden Campaign and Hamish Steele’s hilarious retelling of Egyptian Mythology in Pantheon.

If you like your reads at the bczf2016artier end of the comics spectrum – and live outside the M25 and so don’t get to go to events like LCAF – then the Bristol Comics and Zine Fair is a perfect day out for you. Now in it’s sixth year the event is held in the old fire station in the city centre, and features a fantastic range of genuine small press talents, from ‘names’ like Avery Hill and Mike Medaglia, to up and coming artists and zine makers from all over the country, not just the West Country.

indie-round-upThis week’s indie round-up is a mixture of eclectic indie and small press titles, which range from: the best up and coming creators profiled in the Broken Frontier Small Press Yearbook; the latest adventures from Nobrow’s coolest scandi adventurer Hilda in The Bird Parade; the surreal world of a crazy wrestling federation in Joshua Hicks’ Glorious Wrestling Alliance; and the most unconventional book from Avery Hill’s excellent 2016 line-up, Internal Wilderness from Clare Scully.

Metroland #3Avery Hill continue their amazing run of new titles for 2016 with the third issue of Ricky Miller’s time-traveling psychedelic indie adventure Metroland. Olly MacNamee takes a looks at the continuing adventures of struggling rock star Ricky Stardust and the enigmatic Jessica Hill in a book that’s like a cross between Dr Who and Twin Peaks, with a heavy dose of NME to go.

Artificial Flowers

For her follow up to the critically acclaimed The Rabbit, Rachael Smith brings back an old favourite in her new book Artificial Flowers from Avery Hill Publishing. But these days House Party’s Siobhan has more to more to worry about than a few unruly guests – she has to navigate the perils of the London art scene while also looking after her angsty teenage brother!