Launching at the upcoming East London Comics Art Festival, Tim Bird’s latest offering from Avery Hill, The Great North Wood, has been met with a glowing review already. But we were keen to find out more about the secrets of this subtle and meandering read, so we thought we could get in touch with Tim in order to see if we could see the wood for the trees.

Thanks to books like Our Town and From The City To The Sea, Tim Bird has created a unique voice for himself in the UK small press scene, thanks to his thoughtful musings on the modern world told via an almost analytical look at the geography of the world around us. After a brief sojourn into snooker with The Rocket, Tim has headed back into the woods to tell a story of urban growth and decay, via the nocturnal habits of a fox and a late night chicken shop in The Great North Wood.  

For his follow up to the critically acclaimed How To Survive In The North, artist Luke Healy has teamed up with the excellent Avery Hill to produce a collection of three stories abot communication and miscommunication which bridge together to from one over arching graphic novel. We catch up with Luke to find out more about how these stories connect and how they reflect his own world view.

Avery Hill wrap up a year of interesting and eclectic releases with It’s Cold In The River At Night, the first long form book from animator Alex Potts (following the in the foot steps of A Quiet Disaster, also from Avery Hill). It’s billed as ‘a coming of age story about a man who is too old to come of age and doesn’t gain any personal growth’ so how does Potts’ unique brand of anti-storytelling match up to the other Avery Hill books of 2017?

We’ve had those moment where we want to try a new career direction and it hasn’t worked out, but in It’s Cold In The River At Night, the new book from Alex Potts and Avery Hill, our hero Carl takes on the challenge of building coffins for a surly local craftsmen, and gets much more than he bargained for. With it’s mix of melancholic isolation and futility in the face of attempted self discovery, we caught up with Alex to find out more about what drives Carl and co to do what they do.

An artist struggling with missing sculptures, flowers exploding out of buildings courtesy of some eco-anarchist and mysterious singing neighbours. These are the stars of the debut graphic novel from B.Mure that was released by Avery Hill at the Bristol Comics and Zine Fair in October. We catch up with B to find out the secrets of the wonderful world of Ismyre.

Between Thought Bubble, Nottingham Comic Con and the Bristol and Comics Zine fair it’s been a bumper month for amazing indie comics, and so we’ve put together the first, of what we are sure will be several, super round-ups. This one feature’s B. Mure’s delightfully quirky Ismyre, Josh Hicks superb sequel to Glorious Wrestling Alliance: Grappling Road, the haunting Lost Light from Wine and Zine’s Claire Spiller and we are introduced the twisted brilliance of Todd Oliver in Boxes.

As one of our favourite events from 2016, this year’s Bristol Comics and Zine Fair had sky high expectations, but they managed to more than managed to live up these high hopes thanks to an incredibly well run event packed full of exciting and diverse creators in a really fun and packed (and most importantly full!) venue.

Avery Hill continue their run of unique and exciting comics for 2017 with Something City, the debut book from Ellice Weaver. This landscape orientated collection of short stories focuses on the interconnected lives of a group of people living in the titular city and features everything from hip young things, to prisoners in a minimum security prison to nudists! We catch up with Ellice to find out more about the inspiration behind the stories as well as how she created the unique and colourful look.