After the hectic release fest that was this year’s Thought Bubble it was time for a more serene event this weekend as we headed to Bristol for the annual Bristol Comics and Zine Festival, one of our favourite events on the indie and small press friendly convention circuit.

Set on a mining colony in the depths of space Kristyna Baczynski’s Retrograde Orbit is a complex and poignant tale of a young alien girl trying to fit into a world that is different to her own. With it’s subtle look at immigration and identity, we caught up with it’s creator to find out more about about what it is like to be an alien in both senses of the word.

For her full length graphic novel debut, Follow Me In, Katriona Chapman has expanded the small but poignant world of her Katzine travelogues and turned into something much more epic. Chronicling her travels in Mexico and the breakdown of a relationship along the way, it’s part travelogue, part therapy session and so we caught up with Kat to find out how she managed to balance these two disparate elements of her story so well. 

One of three books being released by Avery Hill at this year’s Thought Bubble, Kristyna Baczynski’s Retrograde Orbit is a beautiful and poignant tale about about a young girl looking to find a sense of home and identity in a galaxy where she feels like doesn’t quite belong.

Launching at the upcoming East London Comics Art Festival, Tim Bird’s latest offering from Avery Hill, The Great North Wood, has been met with a glowing review already. But we were keen to find out more about the secrets of this subtle and meandering read, so we thought we could get in touch with Tim in order to see if we could see the wood for the trees.

Thanks to books like Our Town and From The City To The Sea, Tim Bird has created a unique voice for himself in the UK small press scene, thanks to his thoughtful musings on the modern world told via an almost analytical look at the geography of the world around us. After a brief sojourn into snooker with The Rocket, Tim has headed back into the woods to tell a story of urban growth and decay, via the nocturnal habits of a fox and a late night chicken shop in The Great North Wood.  

For his follow up to the critically acclaimed How To Survive In The North, artist Luke Healy has teamed up with the excellent Avery Hill to produce a collection of three stories abot communication and miscommunication which bridge together to from one over arching graphic novel. We catch up with Luke to find out more about how these stories connect and how they reflect his own world view.

Avery Hill wrap up a year of interesting and eclectic releases with It’s Cold In The River At Night, the first long form book from animator Alex Potts (following the in the foot steps of A Quiet Disaster, also from Avery Hill). It’s billed as ‘a coming of age story about a man who is too old to come of age and doesn’t gain any personal growth’ so how does Potts’ unique brand of anti-storytelling match up to the other Avery Hill books of 2017?