The first arc of Jack Foster’s Gun managed that rare thing in indie superheroes of being a book that doesn’t feel like a simple copy of a big two title,and instead felt like it actually had something fresh to say with the genre. A mix of crime noir and a heist thriller, but with capes, it was a firm fixture on our last two best of countdowns, so how will this new story arc live up to that first caper?

We ‘ve not reviewed Comichaus since a glowing write-up of their first issue, but in that time this anthology has gone from strength to strength and even secured a nomination as one of our 10 best comics of 2016. So we thought it was about time we looked at the latest issue of this indie anthology and we were immediately taken by just how far this indie anthology has come in a very short amount of time.

We’ve been a big fan of Polish artist Lukasz Kowalczuk, ever since we discovered the awesome Vreckless Vrestlers, and so we look forward to every new book we get that features his unique blend of 60s underground comix and 80s nostalgia. His latest, Knock Off Wars, is perhaps the perfect blend of everything that makes his work so appealing, so we used it as a chance to catch up with him to find out more about his love of wrestling, violence and action figures!

It’s another crazy month for Kickstarters with and this week sees two previous favourites back for another crack at the crowd-funding nut. We take a look at why you should be pledging your support to the third instalments of monkey based super spy Bubbles O’Seven and edgy sci-fi thriller Brethren Born

This month sees the return of the excellent Leamington Comic Con to the UK calendar on Saturday 25th March at the Royal Spa Centre. With an event that is set to feature big name guests from DC and Marvel, such as Chris Wildgoose and Marc Laming, as well as the best of the small press scene (including Pipedream Comics who will be bringing the Indie Showcase edition of The Pull List), as well as a Cosplay Catwalk and more, it’s a welcome return to one of our favourite cons of the year!

We first encountered the team from Good Comics at the Bristol Comics and Zine Fair back in October, and having crossed paths with them again at last month’s True Believers we thought it really was about time we wrote a bit about their unique collection of ‘micro-published’ comics and zines. We pick out three of the best from their recent winter line-up to give you a taster of the lo-fi world of Good Comics.

Bursting forth from the pages of the Phoenix, courtesy of the frenetic imaginations of the Etherington Brothers comes this second collection of tales starring a young boy who accidentally dies eating oxtail soup and must navigate a mysterious afterworld in order to try and get home. But should the Etherington’s unconventional hero remain long gone?

We’re living in turbulent times politically and although we may feel that our love of comics is a way to escape the harsh realities of real life, they can also be a fantastic medium for exploring the issues of the world around us. A great example of how comics can be politicised for good is the newly launched Draw the Line, a lively, visual guide to positive political action that anyone can take that has been compiled by more than 100 comics artists and illustrators from around the world, including big names like Dave McKean, Steven Appleby and Woodrow Phoenix.

If you’re in the Brighton area in May during the Open Arts Festival, then be sure to take a look inside the new Comic Pop Up store which will be running in Hanover Pub and Restaurant on May 13th. It’s a great event being put together by Simon Russell as his way to try and get new fans into the world of indie comics and will include work from a host of great creators for sale, as well as artists on hand during the day.

We’ve finally reached the end of our True Believers reading list and there are a couple of crackers on it including: a sampler of a dark folk-horror comic called Heretics; a quirky romance that starts on a late night platform in Last Train Home; some zany all-ages action in the Etherington Brothers Monkey Nuts; and some pyromanic fun in Rachael Smith’s I Am Fire.